Finance is not something to be singularly studied and then mastered. It takes time to adequately comprehend everything that feeds into finance and economics, and even more time to keep up with the worldwide and personal changes that can affect the way your spend and make money.

When you’re on the beach this summer, consider mixing up the usual lineup of pulp thrillers with one of these great books on money.

Spend Well, Live Rich: How to Get What You Want with the Money You Have by Michelle Singletary

This is the kind of book that you can judge by the cover. Unpretentious, straightforward and practical, Singletary brings her years of journalism experience to bear on Spend Well. The focus of this book is on common financial questions, with the author providing relatable advice that anyone can follow. If you’re looking to improve your debt situation and spend less, this is the book for you.

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

In the wake of the Great Depression, impoverished journalist Napoleon Hill sought the secrets of wealth, interviewing numerous wealthy individuals over the course of two decades. It doesn’t just offer insight into how to be smart with finances, it’s an inspirational book as well, telling the stories of men and women who grew out of their humble beginnings and made names for themselves.

The Devil’s Financial Dictionary by Jason Zweig

Tongue-in-cheek and humorous, Zweig paints a picture of a hostile and unforgiving Wall Street, deciphering jargon while tearing down the individuals that have made finance so difficult to process for many. It’s a survival guide to a dangerous reality, one that can be navigated with a lot of savvy and perhaps a good sense of humor.

Screw It, Let’s Do It: Lessons In Life by Richard Branson

Written by the founder of Virgin, contrary to what the title may suggest, Branson calls for a more holistic approach to building business based on moral values and environmental preservation. Branson talks about the people that inspired him and how he experienced and overcame numerous obstacles on his personal road to success, with the hope that he can spur others to do the same.

Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Kiyosaki tells the story of his two dads, his own, and his “rich dad” who was actually the father of his best friend. He contrasts how both approached money and spending. It teaches paths to financial freedom and the mindset necessary to not spend beyond one’s means. It’s a great way to change one’s mind about how wealth is generated and spent.