Sarang Ahuja | Finance

Leader, Financial Expert, Game Changer

Category: Sarang Ahuja (Page 2 of 9)

Financial Recovery (1)

Financial Recovery—Acknowledging Your Money Missteps

When it comes to personal finance, it can be easy to continue spending on something that offers you little to no value with a disproportionate level of attachment due to resources you’ve already expended. This is known as the sunk cost fallacy and can cause individuals to act against their best interests and spend more than necessary. When this happens, the best course of action is to ignore the amount already spent and move along, even if this is difficult. Similarly, if you’re caught up in another bad financial habit, the solution is always to acknowledge the issues with your behavior and adjust accordingly. With that in mind, here are a few financial mistakes that are easy to make, but also easy to recognize and fix.

Not planning for a major life change

When something major occurs in your life, you should attempt to anticipate and deal with it as soon as possible. Changing jobs and careers is perhaps the most jarring financial change to make, but the expenses and time associated with major events such as weddings and the birth of a new child can tax you more than you’d expect.

Take advantage of the time you have before the event occurs. When it comes jobs, don’t quit until you’re absolutely certain you’ll be able to support yourself between jobs. Setting up a new job is half the battle, but the other half can often involve pursuing other sources of income that can support you in the interim.

Not tracking online payments

When it comes to online payments, never assume that payments are being made automatically. Even with autopay on, make a list of websites that will be charging you and find time to check them after every payment is made. It can help save you from unexpected late fees and save you the hassle of having to call companies to talk about your payment.

And, as previously stated, never hesitate to let go of a recurring payment if you feel you are no longer gaining value from it.

Not having a budget

Building a budget may seem like a daunting prospect, but there are tried and true rules that can help you easily plan out where your money goes every month. One of the most prominent is the 50/20/30 rule, which states that you should allocate 50% of your monthly funds to necessities, 20% to retirement, savings, and debt payment, and 30% for lifestyle expenses, which involve everything else. You’ll need a way to track this budget, and some online services make it easy, but much of this can be done by writing down relevant information.

Not building additional sources of revenue

Sometimes, time limitations make this difficult, but securing or setting up alternate streams of income can give you more breathing room month to month. This can involve taking on freelance projects, securing a part time job, or even selling old items that you no longer need. Be flexible, and ensure that you have the time to properly dedicate to side projects.

Not having long term goals

Things like retirement can seem like ages away, but knowing the eventual outcomes you are trying to achieve go a long way toward your planning tactics. For that matter, it’s not enough to simply have a goal; you need to know the steps that you want to take to reach that goal, and do the proper research and preparation to ensure that you’ll be able to act on it when the time comes. This can involve managing your debt, creating an emergency fund, and putting serious thought into where you allocate your savings.

A Little Something on the Side

A Little Something on the Side: Getting Started with a Side Job

The dynamic of labor in the United States has changed over the past decade. The long-held institution of the 9-5 job is crumbling in the face of a difficult job market and the increasing interconnectedness of technology. Because of this, individuals are opting to take on smaller part time jobs, sometimes to supplement an existing source of income, and sometimes because of difficulty in securing full time employment. Either way, working a side job can be a valuable asset and resume booster, providing the individual with an alternate cash flow that may not be as consistent or time consuming as a 9-5.

So, if you’re an individual that needs some extra cash, regardless of your reasons for doing so, there are a multitude of avenues you can take. I’d like to discuss some of the options available on the part-time job market.

Driving

Uber and Lyft have effectively disrupted the public transportation industry with crowdsourced drivers and a easy-to-use apps. Known in the industry as rideshare apps, an increasing number of people are becoming Uber and Lyft drivers to earn money on nights and weekends. Though becoming a rideshare driver is not as intensive as becoming a certified taxi driver, there are certain barriers to entry that applicants need to abide by.

Drivers need to submit to a background check in addition to possessing a valid driver’s license, a smartphone, and a car with four exterior doors and five seatbelts. Additionally, some cities may not allow rideshare services to operate, so be sure to know if your area can participate! Still, on a busy weekend night, rideshare drivers can accumulate quite the haul.

Babysitting

Despite being one of the stereotypical jobs for teenagers, a good caregiver can alleviate pressure from parents and make a positive impact on a child’s life. Previously relegated to word of mouth, technology has also made it easier to find babysitting and care gigs. Care.com is one example of a website looking to match babysitters with families in need, and payment is easy to receive through the site.

Depending on when you’re available, you can expect to make anywhere from $12 to $25 an hour babysitting. The high end of the scale is generally seen among night sitters, who assist tired parents with children, particularly babies and newborns.

Writing

Writing freelance blogs and articles has a huge market on the Internet. There are plenty out there if you go looking—but be warned, the pay can often be low. Research is important when writing online; you’ll want to know the regulations of the sites that you’re pitching to, as well as having a solid understanding of the topics that you’re writing about.

Still, nothing beats the flexibility of writing for an online outlet and working wherever you’d like! Find a site that fits your schedule, interests, and needs and have a great time producing quality content.

Design

While it requires a bit of a background to do well, with a bit of artistic know-how, you can create beautiful graphics or design for the web. For doing this, it helps to have a collection of your previous work somewhere on the web; bonus points if you can make your own online portfolio from scratch.

Upwork is an online resource for the errant designer, offering potential leads and jobs to community members. Plus, if you start to gain momentum, the amount of money you can make will increase over time.

Spring Cleaning Your Wallet

wallet

 

Now that tax season is here and the hustle and bustle from the holidays has finally settled down, it’s time to get cleaning, your wallet that is. Now is the perfect time to come up with new financial goals while planning out your financial expenditures for the rest of the year. Tax season is a great motivator to getting your finances on track and looking forward to springtime. Here are the some ways to clean up your financial wallet this season!

 

Pay down your debt

With tax season finally here, now is the best time to pay off as much of your debt as possible. Why? Because your tax return will give you the highest cash value that you own. Now, remember to do this the smart way. If you only got $500 back in taxes, but have $2000 in credit card debt, it may be a better idea to split those payments up to help contribute to a higher monthly payment. But if your tax return is say $3000, then you have enough to pay off your debt and treat yourself! It’s also a good idea to split up your monthly payments to an even amount until you can pay it off in full. This will show creditors that you are able to pay your monthly bills at a consistent rate.

 

Plan out vacations or trips

Now is the best time to plan out any family vacations or yearly trips. For one, you have more time to do so now as it’s still snowing and cold outside. Once spring time hits you’ll want to spend as much time outside as possible, without the worry of planning your yearly travel plans. Now is also a good time to plan things out because again, tax season is here so you may have a little extra boost in cash to contribute to your vacation funds.

 

Consider your credit cards

With spring time comes new promotions and rate options available from different financial lenders. For example, there may be a discount on personal or student loans. Many companies also offer great credit card offers with 0% interest or low fees on balance transfers. This is the time to sit down and take a look at your debt to see if there’s anyway you can cut down your monthly payments. Making a phone call to your lender provider can actually be the trick to lowering your rates. You may also consider opening a new credit card or transfer your balances for a lower rate. Whatever you decide to go with, make sure you do your research and talk to a provider before making any important decisions on your finances.

accountant-accounting-adviser-advisor-159804

Tax Season Tips

With tax season here, hopefully you’re not sporadically running around looking for your tax returns, receipts, and other important documents. Hopefully, you have also decided how you will be filing your taxes this year. But if not, have no fear! You still have two months left to file your taxes and most people haven’t even started yet. By following these tips you’ll be able to get organized and ready to file your state, local and federal taxes, but also take these tips to help you become organized for the rest of this year so that you have a smooth tax season next year.

Receipts

One of the most important things to do during tax season, (which sadly most people forget to do) is to save and organize your receipts. The reason for this is because if and when you get audited you have to have proof that you made that purchase (since you are filing it for a return). Many people questions if they should really be saving all of their receipts, however saving all of your receipts will give you an accurate estimate on how much money you spend on categories such as food, entertainment, shopping, etc. Saving your receipts will also allow you to become more organized and when tax season comes around, you’ll know exactly what you can and cannot claim.

Documents

As you already know, you’ll need some important documents to file your taxes. It is your employer’s responsibility to send out your w-2 or 1099 form. (If you are self employed, you should have a 1040 or 1099 form). It’s important not to lose these forms, however, some payroll and employer services have these forms on file. You will also need identification and your social security number. Along with these, you will need to bring along any documents or forms that were received from any stocks, investments or bank accounts that you will receive. Be sure to stay organized and keep everything together.

DIY or HIRE?

Another step you’ll need to consider is how do you want to file your taxes. It may be easier to hire someone, but it could also be costly. If you make over $200,000 a year, it is recommended that you hire an accountant to do your taxes for you as they will ensure that the least amount of mistakes are made. If you didn’t make much money, are not a homeowner or a business owner, and can’t claim anyone but yourself, filing your taxes via DIY may be the way to go. For one, you will usually find out how much your return will be right away. You can also do these at home with the click of a button so it saves you time and money. However, you do take the risk of making a mistake. Again, it’s always best if you can have professional advice to help you decide which way is best for you to file.

 

computer

Achieving Financial Success This Year

As the New Year is finally here, many are taking on New Year’s resolutions. However, come a week after new years, followed by months of setting your goals aside, we end up in the same position as last year, with our goals being dusted away and forgotten The new year has always been known for starting a new chapter in our lives, therefore it’s a great time to write down a list of goals to commit to. Here are five ways to actually reach and commit to your financial goals.

Commit to the Envelope Method

Let’s go back to a time before online banking and smart technology. One of the most successful savings methods used was the envelope method. Today, this method can be applied on your smartphone or tablet, or the old fashioned way. The concept is to create different envelopes for your spending habits so that you don’t go over your spending budget. This is a successful method as you are able to see how much money you have (or don’t have) to spend. It works great with paper envelopes, or you can organize your bank account through various online envelopes.  Creating this habit will allow you to stay committed to your goals.

 

Cook for 30 days straight

You hear me right. January is a great time to save money. First of all, who wants to go out in the middle of winter? Secondly, what better time to detox all the sugary baked sweets and holiday treats from the holiday than January? Begin by establishing a meal plan for 30 days straight, then head to the grocery store, and buy only the items you’ll need for your meals/ snacks. If you typically eat out, this will detox your mind and body and allow you to save money and make healthy meal choices. After 30 days, you won’t have the urge to go out to eat every day, as you’ve spent time learning how to cook and see how much money you’ve saved.

 

Make coffee at home

Cooking at home for 30 days straight, includes making coffee at home. The average cup of coffee costs about $2.70. This means an average of $18.90 per week or $907.20 per year. That’s enough to buy you a weekend getaway. Investing in a nice coffee pot and large, quality coffee mug will still save you money throughout the year just buy discontinuing those coffee runs.

 

Focus on quantity, not quality

The idea here is that less is more.The higher quality clothing, household products or items you buy, the the longer it will last, and the less amount of money you’ll spend fixing these items or spending money on replacements. This is a good thing to keep in mind when buying clothing or furniture especially. Once you purchase high quality products, you won’t have the need to buy more until you absolutely need it, hence, saving you money.

 

The Worst Things to Spend Your Money On

man holding money

We live in a society where it is almost impossible to get by without spending money. We are so consumed in our work and spending power, that we don’t even notice why we make the spending decisions that we do. There are many things that we can’t get away from spending money on such as street parking, taxes, and health insurance. However, there are many things that you can avoid spending money on and avoid unnecessary purchases. Here are the worst things that consumers spend money on, and ways to save.

 

Buying Brand Names

One of the biggest things consumers tend to care greatly of is brand names. Many people have committed relationships with brand names and items, while others find that brand name and generic items don’t have much of a difference. Brand name items such as clothing, toiletries, and food can cost a lot more money compared to generic items, hence one of the ways people get away with spending half as much as others on groceries. The biggest difference in generic items and brand name items is simply the name of the company, where the ingredients tend to be the same. Buying generic can save you thousands of dollars when shopping. Try it out sometime and see if you can tell the difference!

 

Coffee & Water

You knew it was coming! Spending money on coffee can equal out to over $1000 a year! And don’t even get me started on water bottles, especially if you buy them individually. Consumers tend to spend thousands of dollars a year on the convenience of buying coffee and water. If you were looking to save money, investing in a coffee pot and water filter would be your way to go. If you still can’t give up your morning coffee ritual, at least bring your own coffee mug. Some cafes give you a discount for using your own cup, plus it’s better for the environment.

ATM FEES

One of the most inconvenient places to spend your money, right? Although it’s important to carry cash around, heading to the nearest ATM won’t help you save money. ATMs can charge consumers anywhere between $2-$5 for taking out cash, adding up to hundreds of dollars a year if you’re an advocate visitor. Instead, taking some extra time to visit your regular bank on a weekly or monthly basis may help you save money. You can also visit your bank’s ATMs where you won’t be charged.

 

Online shopping

In today’s society, time is spent in a completely different way. A big reason for this is the advancement of the internet, which allows us to save time on things such as shopping. However, this also means spending more money. For one, monthly uses of the internet can become costly, depending on your plan. Although online shopping may be much more convenient than running to the store and purchasing your items, the costs of shipping and handling can become expensive. There are only a few sites that offer free shipping, whereas others require a yearly subscription (amazon) or shipping fees for each item. Unless you live miles and miles away from a shopping mall, convenience store, or grocery store, you’ll save a lot more money that you can use towards shopping if you don’t do it online on a regular basis.

Top 5 Finance Books To Read Before You Turn 30

reading book

Becoming financially successful typically cannot be done overnight. It takes a lot of time, practice and decision making to reach the ultimate peak. However, you don’t have to wait until your retirement to live financially free. One of the best things an individual can do to practice financial success is to read. Although it doesn’t sound like much, reading can help expand the mind of individuals and fill your brain with the confidence and power for strong decision making, problem solving, and analytical thinking. Here are 5 books you should read before turning 30, to get on the road to a financially free life.

 

Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

As previously mentioned, decision making is a very important aspect of finance. Kahneman talks in detail about the two different types of thinking that drag our minds into making decisions, allowing us to understand the reasons behind why and how we make important, life decisions. This book will allow open your mind up in the way that we think and allow you to make choices in a way you never have before.

 

Debt-Free By 30 by Jason Anthony and Karl Kluck

As many people are burdened with debt, they also tend to think that there is no way out. However, Debt-Free by 30 offers resources, tools, and advice by two young men who have reached their peak debt point. The authors were living for and under control of their debt, when they decided it was time to get their lives back. Anyone who’s ever felt like they will never get their life back should consider reading this book and becoming prepared for the challenges that life can take us by. There is a way out.

 

The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke by Suze Orman

As many young people graduate high school and college and look for the next step in their lives, it is no surprise that millennials don’t know where to begin their financial journey. This book is a step by step guide in understanding your finances straight out of school. It even includes financial vocabulary to help reader gain a thorough understanding of finances in life. Schools typically don’t teach finances in today’s world, so whether you’re looking to buy a house, get out of debt, or come up with a financial plan, this book is a must read.

The Millionaire Next Door by, Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko

Many people believe in order to become a millionaire, one must be born into money. However, this book will help you understand why this concept is a myth and what it really takes to become a millionaire. Through hard work, dedication, and financial planning, you can be on your road to financial success.

 

The Behavior Gap: Simple Ways to Stop Doing Dumb Things with Money by Carl Richards

We live in a society where buying things for satisfaction controls our financial decisions and spending habits. Richards explains in detail the theory of “the behavior gap” for consumers to understand their reality and have the ability to change their train of financial thought.

saving

Post-College Financing

For those of you out there who have just finished another chapter of your life and graduated college, congratulations! You’re ready to take on life choices and decisions and you’ve officially entered adulthood. This means that you’re on the road to finding financial success and will most likely begin paying off your loans from the last four years. Although it can be a hard subject to think about, taking control of your finances post college life is attainable. By following these four steps, you can be on your way for financial success.

 

Calculate your Debt

As hard as it may be to think about how much money you don’t have, knowing how much you owe is crucial to come up with a plan to paying back your loans. Once you have established a number, write it down. This will allow you to keep track of your payback progress. When making monthly payments, it’s also a good idea to set up automatic payments. Automatic payments will ensure that your payments are always on time and establish a positive credit score and a good relationship with your bank.

 

Keep an Eye on your Credit Score

College is about learning from your mistakes, right? As soon as you get out of college ( or even before), you should keep an eye on your credit score. Whether you’ve applied for loans/ credit cards or not, monitoring your score will help protect you from fraud and identity theft. It’s also important to keep in mind that checking your credit report too often can actually hurt your score. If you’re planning on taking out a mortgage or big loan this year, keep the credit pulling to a minimum, such as 3 times a year. However, checking your monthly FICO score is a great idea to have an idea where your credit stands. FICO works by predicting what your actual score is. It’s usually offered with online credit card statements, therefore you can look at it as much as you’d like without worrying about your score going down.

 

Emergency Savings

Although setting up a 401k and retirement is important as a post college student, it’s more important to have an emergency savings account set up as soon as you can. If you come out of college with a job lined up, consider yourself lucky. Otherwise, you’ll need to set up a plan for living costs, such as moving back in with your parents or finding freelance work. When your income isn’t steady, an emergency living plan is more important than setting up a retirement plan. The reality is that you went to college to find a job, so eventually you will find one. But some unexpected costs may come up, such as car damages, shopping for interview clothes, or other emergencies could potentially come up, so you have to be ready.

 

Create a Budget

My best overall advice for college graduates, is to start thinking about your future monthly expenses before you graduate so that you’re not shocked when it comes to paying your bills post college. Then, create a budget to keep in mind. This will also help you in the long run when you make more money than you’re spending, allowing you to create savings plans.

6 Ways To Save Money During the Holidays

6 Ways To Save Money During the Holidays

When the holidays roll around, it can be easy to empty your pockets with all of the gift shopping. When you’re getting your friends and family gifts, it can be difficult to stick to a budget. It certainly is challenging to save money during the holidays, but that it’s not impossible. Here are a few ways to save some cash during the holiday season:

1) Choose a budget first.

Many people make the mistake of starting out their holiday shopping by thinking of everyone they need to shop for. This can lead shoppers to spend a lot more money than they expect. Instead, set your holiday budget before you even enter a store. Make sure you consider the little extra costs like postage for holiday cards or party favors.

2) Make a list of people who will be receiving gifts.

Now that you’ve set your budget, you can make a list of everyone you want to buy gifts for. Then, go down the list and decide how much money you can spend on each person. If the sum of these hypothetical expenses exceeds your holiday budget, go through your list again and cut names or amounts. If you have a big family, make a gift list with other relatives so that you don’t have to buy a gift for everyone.

3) Temper your children’s expectations.

With all of the commercials for new toys that come on TV during the holidays, your children may write some pretty long Christmas lists. It’s a good idea to ask them to just write down one or two things they really want. You can get them more toys than that but it’s a good idea for them to understand that there are limits.

4) Engage in cheaper traditions.

Traditions play a big role in making the holidays special. However, some traditions can be pricey. If you travel during the holidays, buy your kids extravagant gifts or pay for a special attraction, you can find yourself in a financial rut when the New Year comes around. Instead, choose more cost-friendly traditions, such as baking together, touring neighborhood Christmas lights, sledding or watching a movie at home.

5) Budget your time.

If you wait until the last minute to buy a gift, you’ll have to pay a much higher value than if you’d shopped earlier. If you allow enough time for your holiday preparations, you’ll be able to save a pretty penny. In addition to shopping, these holiday preparations can include baking or wrapping presents that you’re planning to mail cross-country.

6) Give gifts with meaning rather than monetary value.

It can be easy to think that the best gifts are the most expensive ones. However, it is often the gifts with sentimental value that truly make people happy. Don’t get caught up in the cost but rather in the meaning of the gift. If you can make or purchase a gift that truly speaks to the person you’re giving it to, or says something about your relationship with the person, you’re bound to get a positive reaction.

It may seem like the holiday season is a time for excessive spending, but there are many ways to cut back. If you follow these helpful tips, you’ll be able to have a fun holiday season while still having enough money saved up for the new year ahead.

 

5 Ways to Make Sure Your Family is Protected Financially

Personal_Finance_sarang ahuja

Financial security often feels like a tenuous thing. What you can afford today might not be quite so affordable tomorrow, especially if something happens to destroy your income: a job loss, the death of the family breadwinner, or an accident or injury that prevents the breadwinner from returning to work for a long period of time. While you can’t prepare for every possibility in life, you can take the steps necessary to ensure that your family is protected financially.

1. Define financial protection.

What does financial protection look like for your family? Your answer may be different depending on your family’s unique needs. In order to attain financial protection for your family, however, you must first define what “protection” looks like to you. Is it having a cushion that will provide for a few months in the event of an emergency or other unforeseen event? Do you need to provide for your family for a potential period of years in the event of your death? Take the time to clearly lay out what financial protection looks like to your family.

2. Think about future needs. 

When you’re evaluating your financial protection, you need to imagine the position you would be in if something catastrophic were to occur to your family and plan for it. Be sure to take all of the facets of your current situation into consideration. For example, if you’re the primary breadwinner while your spouse stays at home with the children, you might already know that you need to have a life insurance policy that will allow your spouse to complete their schooling, update their certifications, or take other steps to rejoin the workforce without having to worry about money. At the same time, however, you must take into consideration expenses that would occur should the stay-at-home spouse be lost. Small children might have to be placed in daycare, while older ones might have to transition to after-school care. Preparing for the possibility of these expenses should be part of your financial protection plan.

3. Secure your savings.

A life insurance policy and a disability insurance policy will go a long way toward ensuring that necessary expenses are paid in the event of death or injury. To truly secure your family’s financial future, however, you must have savings that will help cover other eventualities, as well. Are you prepared for a long period of unemployment? A sudden illness that requires extensive medical care? Many financial professionals recommend a savings account that has been built up enough to cover six months of expenses. That gives you a cushion while you decide what you’re going to do next. Make contributing to your savings account one of the highest priorities in your regular spending.

4. Start with the necessities.

You can’t build your family’s financial future overnight. As much as you would like to be able to provide everything your spouse and children need even if something happens to you, you might not be able to fulfill that dream immediately. Instead, define actual needs. What’s the minimum that your spouse would need in order to survive following your death? What do your children have to have in order to make it through high school? Make those things the first priority. You can build your financial portfolio from there as your means increase. Take a hard look at what will be necessary in order to accomplish those goals, and make sure you’ve taken the time to run the numbers.

5. Ask for help.

If you’re struggling to juggle the combination of trusts, insurance policies, and investment accounts that will provide for your family, don’t force yourself to keep doing it alone! Instead, reach out to a trusted adviser to help you put the pieces together. That individual will be able to help you go through the numbers and develop a plan to help your family through those difficult days.

Financial protection is about one thing: peace of mind. Life has a way of throwing difficulty your way when you least expect it. Careful financial planning, however, can ensure that your family is financially protected enough to weather those storms. You can’t predict everything, but you can take the steps necessary to secure your family’s financial future for at least the period immediately following a potentially catastrophic event, offering an extra layer of protection and peace to your family.

Page 2 of 9

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén