When it comes to personal finance, it can be easy to continue spending on something that offers you little to no value with a disproportionate level of attachment due to resources you’ve already expended. This is known as the sunk cost fallacy and can cause individuals to act against their best interests and spend more than necessary. When this happens, the best course of action is to ignore the amount already spent and move along, even if this is difficult. Similarly, if you’re caught up in another bad financial habit, the solution is always to acknowledge the issues with your behavior and adjust accordingly. With that in mind, here are a few financial mistakes that are easy to make, but also easy to recognize and fix.

Not planning for a major life change

When something major occurs in your life, you should attempt to anticipate and deal with it as soon as possible. Changing jobs and careers is perhaps the most jarring financial change to make, but the expenses and time associated with major events such as weddings and the birth of a new child can tax you more than you’d expect.

Take advantage of the time you have before the event occurs. When it comes jobs, don’t quit until you’re absolutely certain you’ll be able to support yourself between jobs. Setting up a new job is half the battle, but the other half can often involve pursuing other sources of income that can support you in the interim.

Not tracking online payments

When it comes to online payments, never assume that payments are being made automatically. Even with autopay on, make a list of websites that will be charging you and find time to check them after every payment is made. It can help save you from unexpected late fees and save you the hassle of having to call companies to talk about your payment.

And, as previously stated, never hesitate to let go of a recurring payment if you feel you are no longer gaining value from it.

Not having a budget

Building a budget may seem like a daunting prospect, but there are tried and true rules that can help you easily plan out where your money goes every month. One of the most prominent is the 50/20/30 rule, which states that you should allocate 50% of your monthly funds to necessities, 20% to retirement, savings, and debt payment, and 30% for lifestyle expenses, which involve everything else. You’ll need a way to track this budget, and some online services make it easy, but much of this can be done by writing down relevant information.

Not building additional sources of revenue

Sometimes, time limitations make this difficult, but securing or setting up alternate streams of income can give you more breathing room month to month. This can involve taking on freelance projects, securing a part time job, or even selling old items that you no longer need. Be flexible, and ensure that you have the time to properly dedicate to side projects.

Not having long term goals

Things like retirement can seem like ages away, but knowing the eventual outcomes you are trying to achieve go a long way toward your planning tactics. For that matter, it’s not enough to simply have a goal; you need to know the steps that you want to take to reach that goal, and do the proper research and preparation to ensure that you’ll be able to act on it when the time comes. This can involve managing your debt, creating an emergency fund, and putting serious thought into where you allocate your savings.