Sarang Ahuja | Finance

Leader, Financial Expert, Game Changer

Tag: spending

Talking to your Kids about Finance—Sarang Ahuja

Talking to Your Kids About Finance

It can be tough to broach the subject of money with kids. After all, they likely haven’t had a real job or had to worry about their own finances early on in their lives. For children, adults appear to have their finances figured out, with magical credit cards that allow them to pay for everything and no knowledge of what goes on behind the scenes. Talks about the value of saving money are generally the baseline measure taken to help kids understand finance, but even then, the idea of spending and saving money may seem a world away to them.

I’d like to share a few of the ways that you can talk to your kids about money in a way that can prepare them for the future.

Explain how your finances work.

Children are renowned for their curiosity, and when speaking with them, it helps to treat them like people and not talk down to them. That said, it can be difficult to explain finances in terms that they would readily understand. But some of the basics—how a credit card must be paid back, how monthly expenses can define a budget—can be crucial in giving your children a sense of the effort that goes into managing money.

With the amount of automation that comes with managing finances, it can seem like an effortless process to an outsider, something that anybody can tell you is certainly not true. Dissect the accounts, payments, and taxes that go into every transaction with your children. You’ll likely find that they’ll have plenty of questions of their own.

Teach Shopping Habits.

Make your kids into smart shoppers by showing them the ways that you compare goods when shopping. Note to them the size and price, and experiment with different brands to spark a discussion about whether or not paying extra for a certain brand is worth it.

Work On Saving Goals.

Saving is one of the basic tenets of financial management, but to what end? Work with your children and encourage them to set saving goals, even if they’re relatively minor. Is there a new game that they want? Talk to them about the price and how long it will take to save up for it. If they get a regular allowance, help put in perspective how far their money goes. Start a savings account for your child, and teach them the value of setting funds aside for the future. Talk to them about setting aside things like birthday and holiday money in this account.

Set a Budget.

This one is more geared at older kids coming up on their teens, but breaking down monthly expenses and comparing them to income is a valuable lesson. As a child, it can be easy to forget about the transactions that keep an individual afloat, from rent to food to car payments. Create a somewhat simplified budget with them, giving them a better sense of how you allocate your finances each month, and give them the chance to plan one of their own.

Invest Wisely.

Once you’ve covered a lot of the basics, talk of stocks and investment can help kids understand the value inherent in businesses. Make it a family activity; have every individual track a stock and discuss the highs and lows that it goes through over the course of several weeks.

Teach Giving.

With all of the pressure to accumulate enough cash to balance a budget, it is still important to teach your children that, at the end of the day, there is still always someone less fortunate that is worth giving back to. Encourage them to research different charities, and perhaps even foster their own fundraising efforts for giving back to the cause of their choice.

After all, it’s not just about encouraging them to be better spenders, but encouraging them to be better people.

Financial Recovery (1)

Financial Recovery—Acknowledging Your Money Missteps

When it comes to personal finance, it can be easy to continue spending on something that offers you little to no value with a disproportionate level of attachment due to resources you’ve already expended. This is known as the sunk cost fallacy and can cause individuals to act against their best interests and spend more than necessary. When this happens, the best course of action is to ignore the amount already spent and move along, even if this is difficult. Similarly, if you’re caught up in another bad financial habit, the solution is always to acknowledge the issues with your behavior and adjust accordingly. With that in mind, here are a few financial mistakes that are easy to make, but also easy to recognize and fix.

Not planning for a major life change

When something major occurs in your life, you should attempt to anticipate and deal with it as soon as possible. Changing jobs and careers is perhaps the most jarring financial change to make, but the expenses and time associated with major events such as weddings and the birth of a new child can tax you more than you’d expect.

Take advantage of the time you have before the event occurs. When it comes jobs, don’t quit until you’re absolutely certain you’ll be able to support yourself between jobs. Setting up a new job is half the battle, but the other half can often involve pursuing other sources of income that can support you in the interim.

Not tracking online payments

When it comes to online payments, never assume that payments are being made automatically. Even with autopay on, make a list of websites that will be charging you and find time to check them after every payment is made. It can help save you from unexpected late fees and save you the hassle of having to call companies to talk about your payment.

And, as previously stated, never hesitate to let go of a recurring payment if you feel you are no longer gaining value from it.

Not having a budget

Building a budget may seem like a daunting prospect, but there are tried and true rules that can help you easily plan out where your money goes every month. One of the most prominent is the 50/20/30 rule, which states that you should allocate 50% of your monthly funds to necessities, 20% to retirement, savings, and debt payment, and 30% for lifestyle expenses, which involve everything else. You’ll need a way to track this budget, and some online services make it easy, but much of this can be done by writing down relevant information.

Not building additional sources of revenue

Sometimes, time limitations make this difficult, but securing or setting up alternate streams of income can give you more breathing room month to month. This can involve taking on freelance projects, securing a part time job, or even selling old items that you no longer need. Be flexible, and ensure that you have the time to properly dedicate to side projects.

Not having long term goals

Things like retirement can seem like ages away, but knowing the eventual outcomes you are trying to achieve go a long way toward your planning tactics. For that matter, it’s not enough to simply have a goal; you need to know the steps that you want to take to reach that goal, and do the proper research and preparation to ensure that you’ll be able to act on it when the time comes. This can involve managing your debt, creating an emergency fund, and putting serious thought into where you allocate your savings.

The Worst Things to Spend Your Money On

man holding money

We live in a society where it is almost impossible to get by without spending money. We are so consumed in our work and spending power, that we don’t even notice why we make the spending decisions that we do. There are many things that we can’t get away from spending money on such as street parking, taxes, and health insurance. However, there are many things that you can avoid spending money on and avoid unnecessary purchases. Here are the worst things that consumers spend money on, and ways to save.

 

Buying Brand Names

One of the biggest things consumers tend to care greatly of is brand names. Many people have committed relationships with brand names and items, while others find that brand name and generic items don’t have much of a difference. Brand name items such as clothing, toiletries, and food can cost a lot more money compared to generic items, hence one of the ways people get away with spending half as much as others on groceries. The biggest difference in generic items and brand name items is simply the name of the company, where the ingredients tend to be the same. Buying generic can save you thousands of dollars when shopping. Try it out sometime and see if you can tell the difference!

 

Coffee & Water

You knew it was coming! Spending money on coffee can equal out to over $1000 a year! And don’t even get me started on water bottles, especially if you buy them individually. Consumers tend to spend thousands of dollars a year on the convenience of buying coffee and water. If you were looking to save money, investing in a coffee pot and water filter would be your way to go. If you still can’t give up your morning coffee ritual, at least bring your own coffee mug. Some cafes give you a discount for using your own cup, plus it’s better for the environment.

ATM FEES

One of the most inconvenient places to spend your money, right? Although it’s important to carry cash around, heading to the nearest ATM won’t help you save money. ATMs can charge consumers anywhere between $2-$5 for taking out cash, adding up to hundreds of dollars a year if you’re an advocate visitor. Instead, taking some extra time to visit your regular bank on a weekly or monthly basis may help you save money. You can also visit your bank’s ATMs where you won’t be charged.

 

Online shopping

In today’s society, time is spent in a completely different way. A big reason for this is the advancement of the internet, which allows us to save time on things such as shopping. However, this also means spending more money. For one, monthly uses of the internet can become costly, depending on your plan. Although online shopping may be much more convenient than running to the store and purchasing your items, the costs of shipping and handling can become expensive. There are only a few sites that offer free shipping, whereas others require a yearly subscription (amazon) or shipping fees for each item. Unless you live miles and miles away from a shopping mall, convenience store, or grocery store, you’ll save a lot more money that you can use towards shopping if you don’t do it online on a regular basis.

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